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...two travellers in search of the world's wildlife

28 October 2017

Enforced relaxation

Aardwolf, just about

Aardwolf, just about

15 October

So today was an enforced relaxation day (an EFD). What’s an EFD? Well, we are pathologically incapable of relaxing on holidays. Every day must be packed to the max, whether it’s a wildlife watching trip, a cultural break to a major city, or a tour around bucolic countryside. But now and again circumstances force us to relax for most of a day. Terrible waste of time if you ask me.

And that’s what happened today. After taking a dawn walk along the only trail available around Toko (nothing much to see: Klipspringer, Grey Duiker, Rock Hyrax) we then had absolutely no useful activities available to us until another night drive that evening. So we bummed around our room, or a shady seat on the terrace, catching up with blogs and email or just reading a book. What a chore!

Demented hornbill

Demented hornbill

Toko Lodge is more utilitarian than Erongo, a couple of long single-storey buildings with a bunch of rooms, built partly up a low hill so you can look out over the wide expanse of grassland and bush that was apparently cattle ranch country but is now given over to wildlife viewing and game hunting. And I have no idea why a hornbill kept flying at our window, crashing into it, glaring at us through the glass, flying back to his perch, and then repeating the trick again and again and again. Maybe he’d run out of things to do as well?

Our night drive was a bit better – we saw a Cape Fox and an African Wild Cat – but it still wasn’t even close to as good as other mammal-watchers have seen at Toko. Still windy, alas. And I seem to have picked up a bit of a sore throat, possibly from all the dust I’ve swallowed on these night drive!

Scrub hare

Scrub hare


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